Barack Obama Frees Al-Qaeda Terrorist Ali Saleh Kahlah al-Marri From Prison Early, al-Marri Plotted to Put Cyanide Gas Into NYC Subway System, Are you Nuts B.O.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

HIJO DE UNA DE LAS FAMILIAS MÁS RICAS DE QATAR, ALI SALEH KAHLAH AL TARRI ESTUDIÓ DE UNA DE LAS UNIVERSIDADES PRIVADAS MÁS CARAS DE EE.UU., SIENDO DESDE HACE AÑOS RESIDENTE PERMANENTE EN AQUEL PAÍSAli Saleh Kahlah al Marri — an admitted Al Qaeda operative in the United States — was released last week from a federal prison prior to completing his 15-year sentence because of “time served,” the Justice Department told Fox News on Tuesday. Al Marri had been in U.S. custody since 2001, after reportedly being picked up on a routine traffic stop just weeks after the 9-11 terror attacks. During a routine check, police discovered federal authorities already had him on their radar.

Ali Al-Marri, in a file photo.
 Ali Al-Marri, in a file photo:

He was arrested and charged with providing “material support or resources” to 9-11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and other Al Qaeda operatives in 2009.
The 49-year-old al Marri, a Qatar native, at the time of his arrest was a U.S. resident attending graduate school. Al Marri was freed on Friday, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons.
His departure follows a series of releases of detainees from the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, as President Obama tries to close the facility, opened in the wake of the 9-11 attacks.

May 1st, 2009….FBI REPORT…Ali Al-Marri Pleads Guilty to Provide Material Support to Al-Qaeda for Cyanide Gas Plot NYC Subway System. Ali al-Marri was an al-Qaeda ‘sleeper’ operative working on U.S. soil and directed by the chief planner of the 9-11 attacks. Al-Marri researched the use of chemical weapons, potential targets and maximum casualties,” said Arthur M. Cummings, II, Executive Assistant Director of the FBI’s National Security Branch. Al-Marri was instructed by Khalid Sheikh Mohammed to enter the United States no later than Sept. 10, 2001, with an understanding that he was to remain in the United States for an undetermined length of time.

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Post 9/11 World - Terror Goes UNDER GROUND</p>
<p>NEW YORK (Tom Hays, AP) — It’s the morning rush in the Times Square subway station, a routine convergence of humanity and mass transit that makes New York City hum.</p>
<p>Mixing seamlessly with subway riders are New York Police Department officers with heavy body armor and high-powered rifles, commanders in blue NYPD polo shirts carrying smart phone-size radiation detectors and a panting police dog named Sabu.<br />
"This is the new normal," Inspector Scott Shanley of the NYPD’s Counterterrorism Division says. "The only people who sometimes get raised up are tourists."<br />
Since terrorists brought down the twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001, subways have been bombed in terror attacks across the world, including in Madrid, London and this spring in Minsk, Belarus. The possibility that New York’s sprawling, porous and famously gritty subway system could be next has become a constant worry — leading to a new normal of suspicious package alerts, bomb-sniffing dogs, cameras trained on commuters and passengers listening to the missive, “if you see something, say something.”<br />
The campaigns encouraging residents to report suspicious activity strike Manhattan writer Anne Nelson, 57, as Orwellian.<br />
"New York is about expression and life and vibrancy," she said, walking through Times Square. "It’s not about living in an atmosphere of fear."<br />
But authorities here believe a serious attack on the 24-hour subway system with more than 400 stations, would potentially cripple the city in ways worse than the Sept. 11, 2001 attack — a concern shared by U.S. cities and countries reliant on mass transit and viewed as enemies by terrorists.<br />
The human toll — going back to Aum Shinrikyo cult’s 1995 nerve gas attack that killed 12 people and injured thousands in Tokyo’s subways — has already been devastating. In Madrid, Islamic militants set off 10 backpack bombs on the commuter rail network in 2004, killing 191 people and wounding more than 1,800; in London, another suicide bomb strike killed 52 commuters and injured 700 in the city’s deadliest attack since World War II; and earlier this year in Minsk, a remote-controlled bomb killed 12 people and wounded 200 in the city’s main subway station.<br />
In New York, no one has pulled off an attack, but there have been plenty of scares.<br />
Last year, a homegrown al-Qaida operative, Najibullah Zazi, pleaded guilty to plotting a suicide bomb attack timed for rush hour to cause the most bloodshed. The former airport shuttle driver told a judge his plan was “to conduct a martyrdom operation on the subway lines in Manhattan.” The NYPD also foiled a 2004 plot to bomb Manhattan’s Herald Square subway station. And there were reports in that al-Qaida considered a cyanide attack on the subway system in 2003.<br />
New York’s subway system, the largest in the U.S., has more than 465 far-flung stations, most with multiple entrances, and 800 miles (1,290 kilometers) of track. Last year, it carried 5.2 million riders on the average weekday — more than double the number of travelers who pass through U.S. airports each day.<br />
"It’s really a potentially very vulnerable environment — one that you can’t totally protect," said William Bratton, a security firm executive who’s headed New York and Los Angeles’ police departments and was chief of the New York City transit police. "That’s the reality of it. … It’s a unique challenge."<br />
Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly has said the NYPD tries to meet that challenge by going to “extraordinary lengths” in the subways “to make our presence seen and felt in different ways, giving would-be terrorists and common criminals cause to think twice.<br />
Pre-2001, covering that ground meant mostly fighting conventional crime — from robberies and assaults to fare beating and drug possession.<br />
Post, the department has asked its 2,500 uniformed and plainclothes transit officers to fight terror as well.<br />
Officers have been given training in how to spot terror suspects casing the subways. They’ve also been instructed to be on the alert for people walking in a stiff manner, sweating heavily and talking to themselves — signs of a potential suicide bomber.<br />
The counterterror arsenal includes more than 30 bomb-sniffing dogs; silent alarms and motion detectors to prevent tampering with ventilation systems to make a chemical or biological attack more lethal; and a vast system of security cameras wired with live feeds from Penn Station, Grand Central Terminal and Herald Square.<br />
More new normal: Random bag checks — once challenged in court as a civil rights violation — are done tens of thousands of times each year in the subways with barely any complaints. The department uses high-tech detection devices to screen riders for peroxides or nitrates common in homemade explosives, sometimes with the help of agents on loan from the Transportation Safety Administration.<br />
The bag searches are part of life in Boston and in Washington, D.C., where a Virginia man admitted this year to joining what he thought was an al-Qaida plot to bomb Washington’s Metrorail system. The “see something, say something” campaign” started in New York is now a mantra aboard Amtrak.<br />
New York’s strategy also includes regular tunnel inspections and roving teams of officers who go onto subway cars asking passengers to beware of suspicious packages. The officers can calm commuters, discourage would-be attacks or disrupt plots already set in motion, police say.<br />
Police rely on counterterrorism drills to stay sharp. One exercise involves having an undercover officer with a mock device, stashed in a backpack and emitting gamma rays, slip into the subway to test the ability to detect and neutralize real radioactive threats.<br />
Above ground, the department has dispatched detectives to Moscow, Madrid, London and Mumbai, India, to see what lessons can be learned from overseas terror attacks.<br />
London’s transit system has long been affected by the threat of bombs — there are no garbage bins on the subway or in train stations, for example, a legacy of the years when London was an IRA target.<br />
After the 2005 attack, emergency services were criticized for lapses in their response — confusion, a shortage of first aid supplies and radios that did not work underground.<br />
Police have since been issued digital radios capable of operating throughout the subway system; and some members of the British Transport Police officers now patrol the transit network with guns. Most British police do not carry firearms.<br />
Home Secretary Theresa May, the government official responsible for MI5, said earlier this year that “a considerable number of improvements” had been put in place since 2005 but declined to give details for security reasons.<br />
In Spain, the national rail company Renfe said security measures on that network have in fact been beefed up since the massacre. But it refused to give details, calling the issue confidential and sensitive.<br />
Another state-owned company, Adif, which manages Spain’s long-distance train stations, said it has assigned more guards at train stations and broadened use of closed-circuit security cameras.<br />
The heightened security in subways has become second nature in New York.<br />
But after walking through Grand Central Terminal last week, 54-year-old consultant Robin Gant said the threat of terrorism still weighs on her 10 years after the Sept. 11 attacks. But she wondered about how one can fairly point out who’s a threat.<br />
"I look at people and who’s to judge? You just never know who might be the one," she said. "No matter how safe you feel, you’re always on yellow alert."</p>
<p>Original Article

Al-Marri also conducted online research of various cyanide compounds, including hydrogen cyanide, potassium cyanide, and sodium cyanide. He reviewed toxicity levels, locations where these items could be purchased, and specific pricing of the compounds (SUBWAY PLOT & POISON WATER SUPPLY PLOT). He also explored obtaining sulfuric acid, a well-known binary agent used in a hydrogen cyanide binary device to create cyanide gas. Al-Marri agrees that the government would prove at trial this is the method taught by al Qaeda for manufacturing cyanide gas. He also agrees that the government would prove at trial that an almanac recovered in his residence was bookmarked at pages showing dams, waterways and tunnels in the United States, consistent with al Qaeda attack planning regarding the use of cyanide gases.
Post 9/11 World – Terror Goes UNDER GROUND:

April 25, 2013 – RT The New York City Police Department announced Wednesday that it will deploy, then track, what it calls “harmless” gases into the city’s subway system over three non-consecutive days this summer. The plan, to be enacted in July, will investigate New York’s readiness to handle a chemical terrorist attack by dispersing the colorless gas and tracing it as it flows through the city, according to Scientific American. The test is expected to cost $3.4 million and is scheduled to be carried out in all five boroughs and dozens of stations on 21 of the city’s 34 subway lines.

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